CONCENTRATIONS OF IGG, IGA AND IGM IMMUNOGLOBULIN TYPES IN COLOSTRUM MILK DEPENDING ON THE SEASON PUBLISHED

RADUCAN George Gabriel, TODEA Neli Georgeta, VINTER Gabriel Nicolae gabi2006george@yahoo.com
The aim of the paper was to study the evolution of the immunoglobulin types IgG, IgA and IgM concentrations during the first three days postpartum in Romanian Black and White cows. Samples of colostrum were collected at calving and at 4-hour interval for three days. Samples were analyzed for immunoglobulin concentration using ELISA test. . Immunoglobulin Ig G concentration in colostrum milk was higher in the warm season than in the cold season. The concentration of immunoglobulin Ig A in colostrum milk was higher in the warm season than in the cold season. Immunoglobulin Ig M concentration in colostrum milk was higher in the warm season than in the cold season. In this study, twelve cows from the Romanian black and white breed were taken into consideration from the farm located in Covaci, three of them cows calving in the hot season and nine in the cold season. Four-to four-hour colostral milk samples were taken (18 milkings / cow), immediately after calving, for three days, resulting in 54 samples in cows that calved in the hot season and 162 samples in cows that they have in the cold season. From the data presented it can be seen that the average daily amount of IgG of cows that calved during the hot season (41.89 mg / ml) is higher (p <0.001) by 6.06 mg / ml than that registered in cows that they gave birth in the cold season (35.83 mg / ml), a very statistically significant difference. From the data presented, it can be seen that the average daily amount of IgM of cows that calved during the warm season (4.78 mg / ml) is higher (p> 0.01) by 0.63 mg / ml than that recorded in the case in calves that gave birth in the cold season (4.14 mg / ml), a statistically significant difference
colostrum, immunoglobulin IgG, IgA an IgM, Romanian black and white breed
Biology applied in Agriculture
Presentation: poster

Download



Back