DEVELOPMENT AND YIELD OF FIELD TOMATO UNDER DIFFERENT WATER SUPPLY PUBLISHED

M. D. MÁTÉ, Ildikó SZALÓKINÉ ZIMA zima.ildiko@gk.szie.hu
In this paper the effect of different water supply treatments of processing tomato planted under field conditions was examined in the growing season of 2017, 2018 and 2019, so as to see how these various treatments affect the height of tomato plant and the chlorophyll content of the leaf (SPAD value ). At harvest, the amount and proportion of stems to total fruits, the amount of red (marketable), green and diseased berries within the total crop, and the weight of small, medium and large berries within the red fruits were examined. Besides this, the soluble solids content of the red fruits was also determined. The field experiment was carried out in Szarvas, Hungary on the experimental area (School Land) of Szent István University. The soil type was chernozem meadow. The plots received different water supplies. Treatments are marked with: K; I50; I75; I100. The I100 = 100% represents the same water supply as potential evapotranspiration (PET). The plots with lower water supply received a certain percentage of the irrigation water delivered at 100 % water treatment. Control (K) received only the amount of water by the precipitation besides the required irrigation (irrigation right after planting, irrigation after fertilization events). Increasing water supply results in a rising tendency at plant height and a decreasing trend at SPAD values. Regarding the ratio of stems to total fruits, it can be stated that due to the increasing water supply increases the weight of both the total fruits and the stem. The distribution of the quality categories of all the fruits points to the fact that an excessive dose of water not only increases the total fruit yield but also increases the weight of red (marketable) berries, and the number of ill fruits. Increasing water doses increase the weight of medium and large fruits within the red fruit compared to the control treatment. According to the results of the soluble solids measurement, the increasing water supply decreases the soluble solids content of the fruits. Larger tomato fruits have a slightly lower soluble solids content than medium and smaller fruits have.
tomato, fruit yield, water supply, soluble solids content
Field crops and pastures
Presentation: poster

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