RESEARCH REGARDING IN VITRO REGENERATION OF SOME MAIZE GENOTYPES UNDER THE SALINE STRESS CONDITIONS. PUBLISHED

Georgiana NEGRUȚ 1,2, Dorica BOTĂU 1, T. SUBA 2, Dana SUBA 2, Constanța CHIPER 2 None dbotau@yahoo.com
Salinity is one of the most important forms of abiotic stress, widely distributed in both irrigated and non-irrigated areas of the world. Salty soils are soils with a high salinity content and are defined as soils that directly affect the growth and development of plants in the vegetative growth stage, prior to the reproduction stage, especially affecting crop species (Allakhverdiev et al., 2000; Sairam & Tyagi , 2004; Chinnusamy et al., 2005; Ashraf et al., 2008; Ashraf, 2009). Saline stress strongly affects the growth and development of plants, especially the corn plant, which is reported as a salt-sensitive species. Most crop species are sensitive to salinity, because after subjecting plants to saline stress, crop productivity is reduced by about 6-19%. In general, biochemical, physiological, morphological and anatomical characteristics of crop species directly affected by soil salinity are well established (Ashraf, 2004; Ashraf & Harris, 2004; Chinnusamy et al., 2005; Parida & Das, 2005). Most crop species are sensitive to salinity, because after exposing plants to saline stress, crop productivity is reduced by 6-19%. In general, biochemical, physiological, morphological and anatomical characteristics of crop species directly affected by soil salinity are well established (Ashraf, 2004; Ashraf & Harris, 2004; Chinnusamy et al., 2005; Parida & Das, 2005). There are also numerous reports that salinity induces water deficiency in many crop species, such as corn, sunflower, potato, and soybean (Katerji et al., 1996; Katerji et al., 1998; Katerji et al. ., 2004). A first response observed in plants induced with saline stress is a decrease in plant water potential, resulting in decreased water use efficiency, leading to general toxic damage and reduced growth yield and productivity (Glenn and Brown, 1998; El-Hendawy et al., 2005; Mansour et al., 2005). During our experiment of in vitro testing of four inbred maize lines it was easily observed that the lines are sensitive to saline stress, and also, the decrease of the plant size is directly proportional to the increase in saline concentration.
maize, in vitro, regeneration, genotypes, salinity
Biology applied in Agriculture
Presentation: poster

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